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Full text of "Apple Manual: WindWalker-Manual"

ORI-3111 




The Mystic Runes 
Windwalker 

By Greg Malone 



The Making of Windwalker.. 



As Wind walker's development cycle was winding down, ORIGIN'S art 
director asked the game's author, Greg Malone, to provide samples of his 
research materials to use in documentation and packaging. What the art director 
received was astounding, and provides great insight into the author's attention 
to detail and commitment to authenticity during the making of Windwalker. 

Realistic, player-controlled martial arts maneuvers provide the focus for the 
fast-action sequences in Windwalker. Texts such as "Ninja: Warrior Ways of En- 
lightenment" and "Zen in the Martial Arts" were the primary sources used to 
identify the weapons and tactics employed by the fighting men of the ancient 
Orient. Books could not, however, provide the detailed imagery needed to accu- 
rately depict the intricate movements in the varied disciplines of the martial arts. 
Greg went the extra mile, tracking down experts, and shooting hours of vide- 
otapes and hundreds of still photographs of the live models in action. These 
images were then digitized and incorporated into the real-time, combat graphics. 

As you explore the lands of Windwalker, you will be taken by the Oriental 
flavor of the visuals - the character icons, the architecture, the flora and the fauna 
- in this unique world. Only Greg's painstaking research and the knowledge he 
acquired through books like "The Archaeology of Ancient China," "Oriental Art: 
A Handbook of Styles and Forms," and "The Japanese Garden: Islands of 
Serenity" could bring such vivid imagery to the computer screen. 

While Windwalker does not represent a specific historical or geographic 
perspective, you will discover an adventure that embraces the philosophy and 
culture of the Orient The influence of works including "Chinese Mythology," "I 
Ching, The Book of Changes," and "Chinese Herbal Medicine" become evident as 
you interact with the diverse characters, and pursue the intriguing rewards of 
the game. 

Windwalker may have been designed primarily as entertainment, but the 
experience of playing the game encompasses much more. 



^INDWALKEg 

Table of Contents 



The Summons from Moebius 

The World Below 

Objects of the Realm 

The World Above 

Making Your Way in the World 

Defending Yourself 

Orders of Enlightenment 




Mystic Runes of the 
Windwalker 




THE SUMMONS FROM MOEBIUS 




Illlll 
Illlll 




( Hexagram 35: Earth below, Fire above.) 
Progress. The sun rises above the earth. So does the enlight- 
ened person reveal virtue. Conditions favorable for progress. 
Help others through cleverness and virtue. — 1 Ching 








Greetings to you, my disciple. 1 am Moebius, called the 
Windwalker. 1 walk the boundaries of Time, Space, and 
Thought as an observer of the ways of humanity. 

You seek training and enlightenment. To this end 1 send 
you into the world of turmoil to bring forth justice. 

Good must always give way to evil, evil to good; that is 
the Way. In my travels 1 have found a new evil in the realm 
of Khantun. Not since the rebellion of Kaimen have 1 wit- 
nessed such a blight Enter that realm, dispel darkness, and, if 
you can, achieve enlightenment. 





1 



— 

^\ The goal is distant, the 


How revered is Chao Ti, the 


/ r^^Fi^X test arduous. At times it 


Harmonious Emperor! His 




may prove more practical 


wise policies brought peace 


fckS^^i 1 ■ to avoid a threat than to 


for all his subjects. He 




face it. 


opened the way for trade 


So long as you use 


with the distant land of 


^^EP^ your wits and cleave to 


Nubia. In Chao Ti's reign of 


the Way, your karma will 


three score years no for- 


sustain you in this world. 


eigner has dared to invade 


Should you fail in correct 


Khantun. Achieving 


persistence, dark spirits 


venerable age, Chao Ti 


will carry your spirit away 


governed with the mandate 


to face the Mirror of Truth, 


£ l l 

of Heaven. 


and your failure will come 


Yet evil always lurks; 


back to mock you forever. 


it is the Way. One of the 


Now heed my teach- 


Emperor's Warlords, 


ings, that you may gain 


Zhurong, recently returned 




enlightenment. 


from a mission to Nubia. 
Though he was ordered only 
to pynlnrp thp amhitini k 




THE WORLD 


Zhurong turned to conquest. 




BELOW 


He pillaged Nubia's princi- 
pal city and kidnapped the 
Ivory Princess, daughter of 






the King of Nubia. 






The princess, once 






heiress to a continent, 




(Hexagram 23: Mountain 


now inherits only sorrow 




above, Earth below.) 


as Zhurong's slave. 




Deterioration. The 


Zhurong returned to 




weak earth cannot support 


Khantun filled with ambi- 




the mountain. The realm 


tion and dark purpose. 




deteriorates. Enlightened 


He has conspired with the 




people stabilize their lives 


court alchemist, Shen Jang, 




through generosity toward 


to overthrow Emperor Chao 




the less fortunate. 


Ti. Together the two 




— 1 Ching 





2 



usurpers have imprisoned 






1 have fled to the hills and 




the Emperor and his wife 




caves, but they cannot organ- 


as hostages. Zhurong now 




- ize. You alone, my disciple, 


sits upon the ornate 






must overthrow Zhurong, 


Nightingale Throne. 




defeat Shen Jang and his evil 


Since the tyrant 






spirits, and restore the 


Zhurong rules without 




Harmonious Emperor to his 


the mandate of Heaven, 






Nightingale Throne. 


thousands have resisted 






\ Learn now the nature of 


his rule; before many 




r this realm, that you may 


witnesses, his troops 




move freely in it. 


massacred the protesters. 
Zhurong bans discussion 




The Realm of Khantun 


of the event and puts 




The islands of Khantun 


forth lies that the mas- 




rise from the Boundless 


sacre never happened. 




Ocean like the shells of sea 


Even more than his blood 




turtles. Some islands, large 


thirst, this contempt for 




as continents, hold villages 


truth shows he is unfit to 




and even the Imperial palace. 


rule. To cut off further 




Smaller islands stretch from 


resistance, Zhurong has 




them like the beads of a jade 


conscripted most able- 




necklace. 


bodied men to work the 




The climate is fair through 


faraway jade mines. 




most of the realm. Storms may 


Meanwhile, the 




arise at times. The enlightened 


crazed alchemist has 




person seeks shelter indoors, 


hroi iaht fnrth pvil <;nirit<; 
uivjugiiL hjiui cvii j^/iiiia 




to avoid the peril of lightning 


to take possession of 




strikes. 


Khantun's holy shrines. 




As you visit these lands, 


At each new moon, evil 




mark the passage of time. As 


spreads across the land 




night succeeds day, so do the 


like a rising river. 




phases of the moon mark the 


The priests and 




passage of the months. 


monks are sworn to 




1 place you in this realm 


non-violence; the cowed 




upon a full moon night. As the 


peasants make no resis- 




moon wanes toward new, 


tance; some protesters 




beware. Of late, the nights of 



3 



the new moon, when the sky 
is at its darkest, have brought 
terrors upon the populace. 

In the body of a humble 
fisherman, you begin your 
test in the small fishing 
village of Xiang Loh. Only 
a few people survive here. 
Speak with them to learn 
your first tasks. You may 
procure supplies at the 
merchant's store. Search for 
a medicine man to meet the 
needs of health, and pray at 
the holy shrine to restore 
your spirit. 




Travellers' Tales of the Realm 

As part of the test, I give you no more 
information about the world than the residents of 
Khantun know themselves. In this isolated village, 
citizens know of the further reaches of Khantun's 
geography only as mysterious places mentioned by 
passing sailors. 



To the northeast, 
across the inner reaches 
of the Boundless Ocean, 
lies the Emperor's Celestial 
Palace. Here Zhurong sits 
upon his usurper's throne, 
and the mad alchemist 
pursues his unholy re- 
searches. Here the Emperor 
and his wife lie imprisoned. 

None may enter the 
Palace, save for harmless 
monks. Even Zhurong dares 
not anger the heavenly 
realm by refusing them 
admittance. The guards 
arrest and imprison all 
other entrants. 

Beyond the Palace 
lies the Monastery of the 
Sanctified Order of the 
Enlightened Khisa. In this 
peaceful place monks 
take vows of silence and 
practice the regimen that 
leads to enlightenment. 

Beyond the land of the 
monastery no traveller goes 
— partly because legend 
claims that across the 
ocean lies the Isle of the 
Dead. This mysterious 
realm is an island shrouded 
in perpetual storm. 
Here monsters dwell and 
demons roam freely. A 
mortal traveller cannot 



hope to survive for long 
without magical protection. 

Past the lands of 
Khantun lie areas you 
cannot hope to visit 
during your test. Beyond 
the reach of maps lies the 
continent of Nubia. Far 
across the ocean in an 
unknown direction are 
the Imperial jade mines. 
Your test will not take 
you to these distant lands. 

Personages of the 
Realm 

Here I share with you 
descriptions of persons 
and creatures relevant to 
your task. 



The Imperial Court 
The Harmonious 
Emperor, Chao Ti 




Chao Ti ascended to the 
throne after decades of 
chaos under the Fifteen 
Mad Emperors. In the 
'Thousand Beautiful Days" 



that followed he restored 
authority, 

expunged corruption, 
regulated the currency, 
created schools, established 
the civil bureaucracy, and 
resurrected the Imperial 
state ceremonies. 

The duration of peace 
in his reign has never been 
equalled in the long history 
of Khantun. The Emperor 
remains handsome in his 
venerated old age. His rich 
garments depict dragons 
and mystic symbols. 

The third and fourth 
fingernails on each of his 
hand have grown to no 
less than nine inches long! 

Overthrown in the 
62nd year of his glorious 
reign, the Emperor now lies 
in a cell in the prison tower 
of the Celestial Palace. 

The Empress, 
Cheng Sing 

Once a mere concu- 
bine, Cheng Sing so rose in 
the Emperor's esteem that, 
many decades ago, he 
officially recognized their 
marriage. The people call 
her "Beloved Nightingale" 
for her melodious voice, 
and the Nightingale Throne 
is named for her. She is 



famous for her collection 
of jade, gifts from the people 
and from foreign potentates. 

Cheng Sing blessed the 
Imperial dynasty with many 
heirs, but Zhurong has mur- 
dered them or exiled them to 
the jade mines. Cheng Sing 
herself is believed to be held 
captive with her husband. 

The Warlord 
Zhurong 

There is no more awe- 
some warrior in Khantun 
than the Warlord. He has 
mastered the supremely 
difficult Two Swords Art and 
moves with such speed that 
he can pluck flies from the 
air. He was a promising 
leader in Khantun's defend- 
ing army. Yet his mastery 
brought with it ambition 
and arrogance; he revels in 
his swordsmanship. 

As you would heed 
the Warlord's twin swords, 
disciple, heed the twin 
perils of pride and cruelty, 
or you can be no more 
than Zhurong himself. 

The Imperial 
Alchemist, Shen Jang 

When the Emperor 
designated him as court 





alchemist, the inquisitive 
Shen Jan^ was still lucid. 
Later experiments with 
unholy chemicals wrought 
delusions in his mind. He 
went mad. But his insanity, 
a cunning variety, let him 
simulate correct action. 
So, against Emperor Chao 
Ti's strict instructions, he 
pursued secret researches 
into the forbidden subject 
of astral demonology. 

When Zhurong 
returned from Nubia, the 
Warlord found a willing 
ally in the alchemist. Shen 
Jang evidently cares noth- 
ing for the occupant of the 
Nightingale Throne. He 
only wishes to unleash the 
results of his demented 
researches. Zhurong cares 
just as little for spiritual 
matters, and so he allows 
Shen Jang his insanity. 

Kuafu, the Jailer 

All too many an 
unfortunate soul has been 
placed under the custody 
of Kuafu, the pitiless jailer 
of the Imperial Prison. 
However, though quick 
to brag on how escape- 
proof his prison is, Kuafu's 
vigilance is often in 



question considering his 
penchant for long naps 
punctuated by shrill 
snoring. 

Imperial Guards 

Chao Ti's esteemed 
Palace Stewards, heirs 
to the traditions of a 
hundred generations, 
now work the jade 
mines along with other 
protesters. In their stead 
Zhurong hired dozens of 
ragtags, scoundrels, va- 
grants, and failed 
farmers as his thugs. 
This rabble now guards 
the Celestial Palace, 

Concubines 

Though these lovely 
ladies remain loyal to 
the Emperor, Zhurong 
has made them his 
love-slaves. They are 
trained in the gentle arts 
of song, formal dance, 
and conversation. The 
concubines serve, unof- 
ficially, as central coor- 
dinators for gossip and 
rumor in the court. 

The Nubian Princess 

Formerly the Ivory 
Princess of the king of 



the distant land of Nubia, 
she now leads the life of 
a captive, kidnapped by 
the deceitful Zhurong 
during his recent mission 
of conquest to her home- 
land. Few can learn 
from her since she only 
speaks her native tongue 
and refuses to learn the 
language of Khantun. 

People of Devout 
Ways 

Priests 

These monks have 
devoted their lives to 
maintaining a holy 
shrine. Skilled in ritual 
and serene in outlook, 
they can bless the 
incense you use to send 
your prayers skyward. 
But beware of priests 
possessed by Shen Jang's 
evil spirits. You must 
exorcise these spirits 
to heal the priests 
and restore harmony. 



Monks 

In the Monastery 
of the Enlightened 
Khisa, monks devote 
much effort to copying 
the scrolls of past ages. 
Their monastery library 
holds the lore of ancient 
scholars. 

Shamans 

These an i mist magi- 
cians seek truth through 
contact with nature. By 
protracted study of the 
laws of the wilderness 
these wizened men and 
women deduce ways to 
influence natural law — 
in other words, they 
learn the ways of magic. 

Medicine Men 

Practitioners of the 
arcane rites of alchemy, 
these respected trades- 
men prepare elixirs, heal- 
ing balms, and potions 
that fortify the spirit or 




7 



cleanse the digestive system. With proper study they 
can prepare antidotes to many poisons and drugs. The 
rarity of their ingredients forces them to charge high 
prices for their services. 

Fortunetellers 

For a nominal fee these seers interpret the mystic 
I Ching, or Book of Changes, to predict your fate. Cast 
three coins six times and the fortuneteller will divine 
the timeless wisdom of the ancients. 

People of Humble Ways 
Farmers 

These peaceful folk pray in the shrines each 
morning, farm their rice fields all day, and sleep on 
straw mats at night. Their lives, though strenuous, 
were happy until Zhurong took the throne. They 
gladly offer their dwellings as safe shelters for an 
honorable disciple who seeks rest. 




Fishermen 

Simple folk like farmers, the fishermen trawl for 
shrimp in small boats. They take long trips over the 
Boundless Ocean to many different parts of Khantun. 
Travellers, impressed with the fisherman's profound 



knowledge of the waters, 
often follow his boat to 
interesting places. 

Merchants 

In these trying times 
goods are short, quantities 
small, and prices high. 
Merchants try as best they 
can to maintain stocks of 
useful items. Merchants 
in Khantun maintain high 
integrity and refuse to sell 
their goods to those of im- 
perfect honor. 

Beggars 

By the Harmonious 
Emperor's decree, blind 
people received the 
charity of the state. 
Under Zhurong's rule, the 
blind have been driven to 
beggary. In their humil- 
iating circumstances they 



deserve respect and compassion 
from those more fortunate. 
Though deprived of sight, 
beggars retain keen hearing. 
They often hear information 
others might miss. 

People of Dishonorable 
Ways 
Thieves 

Cowardly skulkers, these 
vagabonds prey upon the 
unwary. They seldom present 
much threat to the disciple of 
clear mind and purpose. But 
beware of the thief's dagger, 
often thrust toward the midriff 
in a rapid assault. If you fall to 
a thief, take consolation that 
they often steal belongings but 
leave you alive — so that the 
thieves may steal from you 
again, another day. 



Assassins 

Among his many other atrocities, 
Zhurong has recruited the deadly ninja, the 
cult of assassins, to carry out his ruthless 
deeds. These black-clad fanatics attack with 
shuriken - throwing stars - and deadly fists. 
Much legend surrounds these people of the 
night, making it difficult for me to advise you. 

Beasts and Monsters 

Khantun's varied wildlife includes white 
herons, sea turtles, and other harmless 
creatures. Enjoy their beauty. The Life Force 
shapes itself in many forms, and the enlight- 
ened person takes joy in them. 

More dangerous to your mission are the 
giant water beetles that rend travellers in their 
jaws. (Fishermen sometimes use the jaws of 
dead beetles as scaling knives.) Beware also of 
the sea dragons, monstrous lizards of titanic 
power. Do not venture too close to these 
creatures of the deep, lest they strike at you by 
surprise. 

Last and deadliest come the monsters 
from beyond this realm, the dark beings 
summoned by the mad alchemist: 

The oni, a giant horned demon of poison- 
ous claws and equally poisonous cruelty. 

The fire elemental, a spectral form whose 
touch imparts burning pain. 

And the astral demon, a malign demigod 
of profound cunning and limitless contempt 
for truth. These demons are possessing and 
desecrating the shrines of Khantun. You must 
exorcise them from those whom they possess. 
I will explain how momentarily. 



Objects of the Realm 

Do not neglect the details of correct living, for 
your mission tests your resourcefulness as well as 
your prowess. In the form of a fisherman, you will 
require money to purchase food and supplies. You 
ma; earn money by procuring goods a merchant 
desires, or as a reward for heroism. If fortune smiles 
upon your venture, you may also discover wooden 
chests of money and belongings. These may be 
washed ashore on beaches or hidden in the depths 
of caverns. 

The currency of Khantun, a small brass coin, 
also purchases other important items: 

Health elixirs that can heal all bodily damage. 

Incense for prayers of restoration. 

Other potions of various natures. 

Parchment, ink, and heron-quill pens, useful for 
copying scrolls. 

Maps of Khantun and environs. 

And the sextant, a navigational instrument 
that uses the position of the sun, stars, and landmarks 
to determine your position. The sextant serves no 
purpose indoors. 

Boats and Ships 

Khantun is a land set upon the water. The 
Boundless Ocean provides food, travel, commerce, 
and defense from invaders. Several kinds of ships 
ride its waters. 

Fishing Boats 

A fishermen will spend three quarters of his life 
on one of these humble vessels hewn from sturdy 
pine, with no more than a single mast and linen sail. 
As your test begins, you stand in Xiang Loh near your 
own boat. 




You may encounter 
fishermen at sea. If you 
hail their boats, they can 
offer directions and even 
sell you supplies. 

Pirate Skiffs 

At sea as on land, 
scurrilous rogues wait to 
plunder the innocent. These 
skiffs, no larger or sturdier 
than the fishing boats they 
rob, travel outside normal 
fishing lanes. 

Aboard pirate skiffs 
ride merciless thieves and 
assassins. They assault their 
victims first with a barrage 
of shuriken, the dishonorable 
throwing star of the ninja. 
Assassins even leap over- 
board and swim over to 
attack you. 

If you can defeat a pirate 
crew, you may take control 
of their vessel and use it as 
your own. But no disciple on 
the path of honor may use 
their lethal shuriken. 

imperial Warships 

Large craft with hulls 
of weathered oak and mighty 
sails, these noble ships now 
serve the tyrant Zhurong, 
Their iron cannons fire metal 
spheres whose impact can 



break bones and send 
the passengers of the 
target vessel flying into 
the cold waters upon 
which they sail. 

Zhurong's guards 
serve as crew. Setting forth 
from the Celestial Palace, 
they search the Boundless 
Sea for resisters. Try to 
elude these warships if 
you wish to avoid struggle. 



THE WORLD 
ABOVE 




(Hexagram 20: Wind 
above, Earth below.) 
Contemplation. As 
the wind moves over the 
earth, so the ancient 
rulers travelled the world 
They visited its regions 
and contemplated its 
many cultures. Observe 
and explore new ideas. 
— I Ching 



12 



I have found that in 
all people of good intent 
dwells the need for enlight- 
enment. They pursue it in 
many ways, some ordinary, 
some curious. Through the 
very act of searching, each 
finds some part of the truth 
behind all material things. 

Yet recall the tale of 
the six blind men who 
found an elephant. One, 
feeling its side, said the 
elephant was like a wall; 
another, feeling the tail, 
argued that it was like a 
rope; a third, feeling the 
ear, retorted that the ele- 
phant seemed much like 
a sail; and so on. 

In the same way 
seekers of truth cannot 
grasp its infinite diversity. 
They treasure their small 
parts of it, and they 
elaborate it with ritual and 
doctrine. Each true in its 
way, none captures the 
whole Truth. 

Do not hold them 
in contempt, disciple. 
Rather, delight in their 
humanity as I do, and 
contemplate the many 
aspects of truth they reveal. 
All can help you in your 
quest for enlightenment. 



Khisanism 

Those of this faith 
follow the path of their 
enlightened founder, who 
passed from this existence 
centuries ago. Followers 
achieve enlightenment 
through contemplation, 
study, prayer, and fasting 
in moderation. 

The devout monks of 
the Sanctified Order guard 
the knowledge of times 
past. Study this lore as they 
do, with clear mind and 
pure desire for enlighten- 
ment. You can copy their 
scrolls freely, so long as 
you have parchment, ink, 
and a quill pen. 

You may even take the 
vow of silence and attempt 
to join the Sanctified Order. 
By joining the monks in 
their daily devotions, 
you show commitment to 
their principles. If you 
are able to prove your 
mastery of self, you may 
earn the marks of their 
Order, the silk robe and 
the oaken staff. 

The founder's serene 
form adorns many shrines 
around Khantun. In these 
shrines you may read the 
Order's Holy Script and 



learn useful prayers for 
renewed energy. Devo- 
tions to the founder's 
memory take the form 
of incense, burned in a 
censer. The benevolent 
priests of the Order can 
bless this incense for you. 
Thereafter, when you burn 
it, your prayers will 
ascend Heavenward and 
be answered, whether or 
not you are in a shrine. 

Certain prayers are 
known by all who practice 
the Khisan way. Though 
the specific words to the 
prayers are inscribed in 
the Holy Script, their 
purposes are thus... 
Physical healing 
Spiritual restoration 
Forgiveness and 
renewed honor 
In these troubled times, 
the mad alchemist Shen 
Jang has summoned evil 
spirits on new moon 
nights to possess the 
priests of the shrines. A 
special prayer of exorcism 
allows you to cast a fiery 
light which removes all 
trace of demonic influ- 
ence from the possessed. 



Shamanism 

Shamans seek truth 
through nature. They study 
the ways of animals and the 
physical realm. Attuned to 
the rhythms of the world, 
these solitary teachers have 
discerned magical spells 
that work on the physical 
form. 

The enchantments rely 
on talismans and on man- 
tras, chants that improve 
concentration and activate 
the realm's magic. All such 
enchantments drain the 
spirit in casting, so that 
only an adept can maintain 
them for long. 

Having discovered 
their spells, shamans 
typically retreat to caves 
and meditate on them. 
Since this retreat often lasts 
all their lives, many spells 
are lost when they pass 
from this realm. Only a 
few enchantments are 
currently known, and their 
mantras are closely 
guarded. You must seek 
the mantras in the lore of 
ages past. 

Shamans create 
talismans that embody their 
enchantments. But to use a 



talisman, you must have the 
shaman bind it to your 
spirit. This requires a ritual 
of divination, wherein the 
shaman examines marks on 
the shell of a sea turtle. Rea- 
sonably enough, shamans 
refuse to carry these shells 
with them, so you must 
provide one. Special care 
must be taken by the practi- 
tioner of talismanic magic 
that he not let his Spirit 
become drained to deple- 
tion. A depleted Spirit will 
surely result in death. 

Levitation sends the 
caster high in the air to 
gain a brief overview of 
his surroundings. The caster 
cannot move laterally while 
levitating, so the spell's use 
is limited. However, it can 
be useful to know who — 
or what — awaits you 
around the next turn. 

Invisibility renders 
others insensible to the 
caster's presence. 

Water-walking allows 
the caster to travel across 
the sea as though walking 
on dry land. 

Invulnerability, most 
powerful of enchantments, 
renders the caster immune 
to bodily harm. 




Idolatry 

Scholars exert much 
ingenuity to deduce the 
ways of the ancient peopl 
called the Nahai. Many 
generations ago these 
primitive people built 
colossal granite idols on 
some of the islands of 
Khantun. Little other 
evidence of the Nahai 
remains; they vanished 
from history before the 
scholars could learn how 
they erected the idols. 

The idols depict 
pagan deities that gaze 
into eternity. The Nahai 
evidently worshipped the 
idols as symbols of their 
tribal spirit. Through 
rituals of music, feasting, 
and their mysterious 
"tantric dance," the Naha 
supposedly secured the 
blessing of their deities. 



learn useful prayers for 
renewed energy. Devo- 
tions to the founder's 
memory take the form 
of incense, burned in a 
censer. The benevolent 
priests of the Order can 
bless this incense for you. 
Thereafter, when you burn 
it, your prayers will 
ascend Heavenward and 
be answered, whether or 
not you are in a shrine. 

Certain prayers are 
known by all who practice 
the Khisan way. Though 
the specific words to the 
prayers are inscribed in 
the Holy Script, their 
purposes are thus... 
Physical healing 
Spiritual restoration 
Forgiveness and 
renewed honor 
In these troubled times, 
the mad alchemist Shen 
Jang has summoned evil 
spirits on new moon 
nights to possess the 
priests of the shrines. A 
special prayer of exorcism 
allows you to cast a fiery 
light which removes all 
trace of demonic influ- 
ence from the possessed. 



Shamanism 

Shamans seek truth 
through nature. They study 
the ways of animals and the 
physical realm. Attuned to 
the rhythms of the world, 
these solitary teachers have 
discerned magical spells 
that work on the physical 
form. 

The enchantments rely 
on talismans and on man- 
tras, chants that improve 
concentration and activate 
the realm's magic. All such 
enchantments drain the 
spirit in casting, so that 
only an adept can maintain 
them for long. 

Having discovered 
their spells, shamans 
typically retreat to caves 
and meditate on them. 
Since this retreat often lasts 
all their lives, many spells 
are lost when they pass 
from this realm. Only a 
few enchantments are 
currently known, and their 
mantras are closely 
guarded. You must seek 
the mantras in the lore of 
ages past. 

Shamans create 
talismans that embody their 
enchantments. But to use a 



talisman, you must have the 
shaman bind it to your 
spirit. This requires a ritual 
of divination, wherein the 
shaman examines marks on 
the shell of a sea turtle. Rea- 
sonably enough, shamans 
refuse to carry these shells 
with them, so you must 
provide one. Special care 
must be taken by the practi- 
tioner of talismanic magic 
that he not let his Spirit 
become drained to deple- 
tion. A depleted Spirit will 
surely result in death. 

Levitation sends the 
caster high in the air to 
gain a brief overview of 
his surroundings. The caster 
cannot move laterally while 
levitating, so the spell's use 
is limited. However, it can 
be useful to know who — 
or what — awaits you 
around the next turn. 

Invisibility renders 
others insensible to the 
caster's presence. 

Water-walking allows 
the caster to travel across 
the sea as though walking 
on dry land. 

Invulnerability, most 
powerful of enchantments, 
renders the caster immune 
to bodily harm. 




Idolatry 

Scholars exert much 
ingenuity to deduce the 
ways of the ancient people 
called the Nahai. Many 
generations ago these 
primitive people built 
colossal granite idols on 
some of the islands of 
Khantun. Little other 
evidence of the Nahai 
remains; they vanished 
from history before the 
scholars could learn how 
they erected the idols. 

The idols depict 
pagan deities that gaze 
into eternity. The Nahai 
evidently worshipped the 
idols as symbols of their 
tribal spirit. Through 
rituals of music, feasting, 
and their mysterious 
"tantric dance," the Nahai 
supposedly secured the 
blessing of their deities. 



Alchemy 

In truth lies immortality. 
Alchemists of Khantun believe that in 
immortality lies truth, and so they seek 
elixirs that preserve and prolong life. 

Alchemy combines the rarest 
herbs and metallic elements in potions 
that benefit the body and spirit — at 
least so the alchemists claim. Some 
of their ingredients seem unlikely 
at best and dangerous at worst, such 
as cinnabar, powdered gold, and rat 
bladders. And yet infinite are the paths 
to Truth. 

The alchemists' patient quests 
have produced several elixirs that 
may help you in your test. Consult 
with medicine men to learn of these. 
No alchemist has yet distilled the Elixir 
of Everlasting Life. All seek a missing 
ingredient, the legendary Peach Seed 
of Immortality. They believe this to 
belong to the God of Luck; but thus 
far no one has been lucky enough to 
find him. 




16 



MAKING YOUR WAY IN THE 
WORLD 




(Hexagram 56: Fire above, Mountain below.) 

Travel. Illumination upon the tranquil mountain 
makes conditions favorable for travel. The enlight- 
ened person is clear-minded and not detained by 
disputes. Progress and good fortune through correct 
persistence. — I Ching 

In the course of your test you may travel the 
whole realm of Khantun. You will face many ob- 
stacles and adversaries. Through correct behavior you 
will not only restore the Emperor to his throne, but 
you will also achieve enlightenment. 

As my disciple, you serve the Way of Truth and 
Understanding. Serve, in this case, by example; let no 
one who witnesses your actions doubt that you follow 
the Way, 

Here I summarize the cardinal virtues of my 
disciples. 



The Way of the Disciple 

A clear and receptive mind — Most curious are 
the ways that people think and act at times. And yet 
all, in their way, seek peace and enlightenment. Since 
every discipline captures some aspect of the Truth, 
respect and learn from the practices of others. 




17 



Unstained honor — Live honorably among 
the people. Steal nothing. Show generosity toward 
the unfortunate. Never flee from a just battle. 
Revere your elders, and respect the common 
people. Live cleanly to achieve enlightenment, 
as the tree must root in clean soil to grow straight 
and tall. 

Never aggressive, yet ready to defend — 

Maintain your physical health as much as your 
spiritual health, for the enlightened person often 
meets those who mock enlightenment and would 
gladly extinguish it. However, note well the vice of 
aggression. The aggressive disciple poisons his 
spirit through pride and reliance on force; study 
Zhurong for an object lesson in these dangers. 
You must not attack without provocation. 

Always seeking understanding — Be tolerant 
of the ignorant, but show no mercy toward igno- 
rance. The darkness of ignorance waits always to 
overwhelm the world; the light of understanding 
flickers without constant care. Peruse the lore of 
past times, copy scrolls as you will, and examine 
their messages for clues to enlightenment. 

Resolute until the deed is done — The test is 
complex and requires many days. You will often 
face obstacles that appear indomitable. Do not 
despair. As the seed is carried far and then falls at 
last to fertile ground, you may not yet have found 
all the tools you require to overcome the obstacle. 

Search widely throughout Khantun. 
Do not delay for long at any one obstacle, 
but seek its solution elsewhere. 

Your mission requires cleverness and rewards 
adroit solutions. 



Know Yourself 

Seek enlightenment first through self-knowledge. 
Learn your capacities by ranking them in the four traditional 
attributes, or qualities, of the disciple. 

As your teacher, I help you visualize your attributes 
by presenting them as rows on the abacus, the traditional 
calculating device. 

Each row of beads on its wire represents one of your 
attributes. Your current status in each attribute is shown 
by the position of the beads. The more beads that slide 
along the row away from their symbol, the weaker that 
attribute becomes. 

As you rise in my Order, you grow stronger in your 
attributes. The beads grow weightier and slide less quickly, 
giving you greater stamina in each attribute. 

Your attributes and their symbols: 

Body, symbolized by the mighty ox, represents your 
health and vigor. Your body attribute is reduced by 
wounds in combat, by lack of food or sleep, and by the 
many other perils of life. When the beads of the body wire 
all slide away from the ox symbol, your physical form has 
expired. The Spectre of Death will try to claim you. 

Spirit is represented by the lightning bolt, for this is 
the life force, the ch'i. This universal force animates your 
form as the lightning enlivens the night sky. Your strength 
of spirit governs the casting of magic. When you cast a 
spell, you expend a certain amount of your life force, and a 
bead slides down the wire. When all your spirit beads slide 
to the right, your enchantment fails. You can regain spiritual 
energy through prayer or through certain rare elixirs. But, 
be forewarned, my disciple... to let one's spirit become 
depleted is to surrender one's life force to the Spectre of 
Death. Caution is urged in the use of magical efforts. 

Honor is represented by the smouldering incense urn. 
The honor from your actions goes forth and drifts among 
men as the smoke from this urn. 

You lose honor by improper social conduct 




19 




or by fleeing from a battle 
in fear. If too many honor 
beads slide away from the 
urn symbol, the common 
people will be less friendly, 
and your task will grow 
more difficult. The suc- 
cessful disciple strives to 
maintain perfect honor. 

Karma, the spiritual 
consequence of your 
actions, is represented by 
the symbol of yin and yang. 
This ancient glyph shows 
that good and evil, the 
positive and the negative, 
are inextricably related. 

In this test karma 
shows how many times 
I allow you to face the 
Spectre of Death. Each 
time your body or spirit 
perishes, I shall steal you 
away from the Spectre 
and restore you to life — 
but a karma bead slides 
down the wire. 

If all of your karma 
beads come to rest away 
from the yin-yang symbol, 
you have failed this test. 
The Spectre of Death 
passes you on to the 
taunting demons of the 
Mirror of Truth. I dare not 
reveal the fate they plan 
for you. 



Journeying 

You will travel by 
land, where you may 
either walk or run; and on 
the sea, where you may 
swim or sail. Do not 
attempt to board another's 
boat, unless it be a dishon- 
orable pirate ship whose 
pilot has fled. 

Note that by exertion 
you can speed your normal 
passage over land or water. 
But be moderate in this, for 
it saps your strength. 

Remember to eat at 
least once a day. A simple 
handful of rice and fish 
cakes can sustain you. 
Sleep, too, is vital to your 
health. Further, you can 
retreat into sleep when you 
want time to pass quickly. 

But be careful where 
you sleep, for dishonorable 
persons seek to plunder 
helpless sleepers. And 
other menaces lurk within 
your own spirit. Dreams 
may awaken you before 
you achieve full rest. 
Worse, should you fall 
short of perfect honor, 
dangerous nightmares may 
plague your tainted spirit. 

Your leather pouch, 
which holds most of your 



20 



possessions, is always at your 
side. You can carry bulky 
possessions at your belt, 
strapped across your back, or 
in hand. You may examine 
these possessions at any time 
except during battle, when 
your attention is obviously 
elsewhere. 

At every turn seek to 
converse with those you 
meet. They may know some- 
thing that can help you. In 
general, anyone you 
approach (save for thieves 
and the like) will strike up a 
conversation. Even those 
who have spoken to you 
before can share further 
information as news travels 
the realm. 

Though the enlightened 
person respects privacy, a 
healthy curiosity about one's 
surroundings is correct. Enter 
buildings that offer open 
doorways. Examine the 
scrolls, cabinets, and shelves 
that you find. You cannot 
know whether one may hold 
something that aids you in 
your mission. 



Defending Yourself 

The enlightened disciple 
never attacks. However, you 
will certainly need to defend 
your life and honor in 
combat. Herewith, my 
advice. 

Training 

Before you begin your 
test, I offer you the chance to 
train your defensive skills. 
First unarmed, then with a 
staff, you will face some of 
the opponents you will 
encounter in the world: 
thieves, assassins, guards, 
and yet more dangerous foes. 
Be aware, though, that those 
whom you will train against 
may be far less aggressive 
than those whom you will 
defend against in the world. 

If you achieve honor- 
able victories in a full cycle 
of training before you begin 
your test, I shall grant you 
early advancement in my 
Order. 

The enlightened person takes 
every opportunity to gain 
self-knowledge. Learn well 
your defensive maneuvers 
and your opponents' patterns 
of aggression before you 
venture forth. 



Unarmed Defense 

Master the four blows: 
punch, high kick, front 
kick, and roundhouse kick. 
The punch and front kick 
are quickest to land, but 
the other kicks are deadly 
and can stagger your oppo- 
nent. Some masters follow 
a high kick with a punch 
for doubled effectiveness. 

Blows aimed at the 
opponent's head yield 
best results, but these are 
the hardest to land. Strikes 
to the midriff prove more 
practical in close quarters. 

Step lightly toward or 
away from the opponent. 
For very rapid closing, use 
handsprings; for rapid dis- 
tancing, use cartwheels. 

The opponent seldom 
expects these adroit ma- 
neuvers. You can escape 
a deadly thrust, or close 
within the foe's guard to 
deliver a thrust of your 
own. The handspring itself 
is an attack, as well. 

At all times strive 
to time your attacks with 
the suddenness of the 
falcon. Strike after the 
opponent has completed 
his attack, and before he 
can prepare another. 



Defending with a Staff 

The staff, symbol of 
spiritual transcendence, 
serves also as protection for 
your physical form. With its 
long reach you may strike 
from a safe distance. 

Master the three staff 
blows: the high swing, 
the low jab, and the front 
thrust. You can also fruit- 
fully employ all the kicks 
described above. 

Front thrusts and low 
jabs, quick and easy to use, 
form the foundation of staff 
technique. High swings 
take longer, but their effect 
when landing is most re- 
warding. Use these with 
finesse, especially while 
the opponent is stunned. 

Concentration; Intuition 

The disciplined 
mind can shut out distrac- 
tions. Employing concen- 
tration, you may speed 
your perceptions so that 
each exchange of blows 
seems to proceed at your 
chosen pace. 

In this state of concen- 
tration you may gauge the 
situation and choose your 
next maneuver when you 
are ready. The opponent 



22 



has no time to make more 
than a single move in 
response. By careful con- 
sideration you may suit 
each maneuver precisely 
to the requirements of 
combat. 

But the trained fighter 
also knows the value of sur- 
rendering to the moment. 
Relying on your intuition, 
you let your ch'i, your 
inner spirit, guide your 
blows. This method is 
practical when your confi- 
dence in your defensive 
skills is high and provides 
great internal satisfaction 
to the intuitive one. 

Reflecting on your 
Experience 

In the flurry of combat 
one seldom musters the 
perspective needed for 
learning. I grant you the 
ability to review each 
combat after it is com- 
pleted. If you reflect 
on your experience, you 
may learn your strengths 
and avoid repeating your 
mistakes. The enlightened 
person reflects on his 
experience in combat. Try 
to discern the techniques 
each enemy employs, and 
develop your own maneu- 



vers to counter them. 

Your Opponents' 
Fighting Styles 

You will discover 
during your training, or 
soon after you begin your 
test, that your opponents 
fight with different tech- 
niques and patterns. For 
example, the clever thief 
often feigns a high, swing- 
ing stab, then suddenly 
turns it into a short thrust. 

Note also the different 
time and effort their man- 
euvers require. A rabbit 
punch or jab falls as quick- 
ly as the lightning. But a 
long sword stroke takes 
much longer. 

Use this information 
about your opponent to 
your advantage. 

Fleeing Combat 

In desperate straits you 
may flee combat. Flight 
from a fair battle brings 
dishonor upon you. You 
will suffer a blot upon your 
honor, and a bead will 
slide to the right on the 
abacus of your abilities. 



The Orders of Earth 

1 . Mongoose 

2. Badger 

3. Boar 

4. Wolf 

5. Lion 

6. Bear 

The Orders of Water 

1 . Barracuda 

2. Manta 

3. Octopus 

4. Shark 

5. Dolphin 

6. Whale 

The Orders of Air 



Raven 

Owl 

Heron 

Falcon 

Condor 

Phoenix 



The Orders of Fire 



Viper 

Cobra 

Crocodile 

Python 

Hydra 

Dragon 



The Order of the 
Windwalker 



THE ORDERS OF ENLIGHTENMENT 



Hexagram 19: Lake below, Earth above.) 

Promotion. The receptive earth above reflects in 
the lake beneath. So is the enlightened person willing 
to teach and learn from others. Exceptional progress 
through persistence. — I Ching 

I mark my disciples' degrees of enlightenment by 
these ranks, called orders. You will achieve greater 
enlightenment through persistent effort, generosity 
toward others, defeat of injustice, and achievement 
of your goals. 

I shall reward your spiritual growth with greater 
prowess in the world below. Recall the abacus of your 
abilities. As the enlightened life grows rich, so each 
bead upon the abacus gains in value according to your 
Order. Thus, when you are hurt or cast magic, the 
beads slide away less often than before. 

Take pride in your increases only as they let you 
pursue your path with more certainty. The Way is not 
pride, but humble regard for one's fellows and har- 
mony with all. 

Remember, there are many things I have not told 
you. They are there for you to learn, as part of your test. 
Now, proceed! The path of the disciple lies before you. 




24 



AUTHOR'S AFTERWORD 




Since the release of MOEBIUS, the predecessor to WIND- 
WALKER, I've given much thought as to the direction and scope 
that WINDWALKER should take. Always foremost in my mind 
has been the desire to provide the player with both a pleasurable 
and intellectually stimulating experience. In such a way, I have 
sought to share, in part, the personal joy that I take in the quest 
for knowledge and understanding about the world around us 
and the inhabitants therein. 

A common theme woven into WINDWALKER's story 
involves the interaction of the player character with persons of 
differing viewpoints and experiences from his own. Perhaps 
lessons about living in our own real world may be drawn from 
these game experiences, though just having fun and high adven- 
ture are worthy rewards alone to the imaginative mind. If 'story 
morals' are transparent to the player, so too might be the other 
hidden lesson to be found in WINDWALKER, i.e. that expanding 
one's awareness of the world around us should be a source of 
great personal pleasure and a challenging end goal within itself. 

Finally, though the player character in WINDWALKER is 
given 10 karma beads, or game lives, within which to 
accomplish the story objectives, we can only be sure of one 
opportunity to fulfill our own personal dreams in this world. 
So, whether you are 1 3 or 30, just starting your life quest, or 
already well along the path, seek to increase your awareness of 
the intricate beauty and diversity that this life and the people you 
meet in it have to offer. There is no greater treasure to be found, 
nor any greater source of both amusement and entertainment! 



Bibliography 

Chinese Alchemy: The Taoist Quest for Immortality; J.C. Cooper; Aquarian Press; 
1984 

Through the Moon Gate: A Guide to China's Historic Monuments; Oxford Univer- 
sity Press; 1986 

Chinese Herbal Medicine; Daniel P. Reid; Shambhala Publications; 1987 
I CHING, The Book of Changes 

The I Ching Coloring Book; Rita Aero; Doubleday & Company; 1 984 

The Archaeology of Ancient China; Kwang-chih Chang; Yale University Press; 
Fourth Edition;! 986 

Oriental Art: A Handbook of Styles and Forms; Auboyer, et al; Rizzoli; 1 980 
Chinese Mythology; Anthony Christie; Peter Bedrick Books; 1985 
Japanese Mythology; Juliet Piggot; Peter Bedrick Books; 1987 
Larousse World Mythology; Pierre Grimal; Excalibur Books; 1965 
Understanding Far Eastern Art; Julia Hutt; E.P. Dutton Div. NAL Penguin, Inc.; 
1987 

The Art of Zen Gardens; A.K. Davidson; Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc.; 1983 

The Japanese Garden: Islands of Serenity; Haruzo Ohashi; Graph ic-sha Publishing 
Co. Ltd; 1986 

Light on Yoga; B.K.S. Iyengar; Schocken Books; 1972 

Tao Magic: The Secret Language of Diagrams and Calligraphy; Laszlo Legeza; 
Thames and Hudson Ltd.; 1975 

An Illustrated Cycle of Chinese Festivities in Malaysia and Singapore; C.S. Wong; 
Jack Chia-MPH Ltd.; 1987 

Zen in the Martial Arts; Joe Hyams; Bantam Books; 1979 

Ninja: Warrior Ways of Enlightenment; Stephen K. Hayes; Ohara Publications, 

Inc.; 1981 



26 



WARRANTY 

ORIGIN SYSTEMS, Inc. LIMITED 90 DAY WARRANTY. ORIGIN warrants to the 
original purchaser of this computer software product that the recording medium on 
which the software programs are recorded will be free from defects in material and 
workmanship for 90 days from the date of purchase. 

If the recording medium is found defective within 90 days of original purchase, 
Origin agrees to replace, free of charge, any such product upon receipt at its Factory 
Service Center of the product, postage paid, with proof of date of purchase. This 
warranty is limited to the recording medium containing the software program originally 
provided by Origin. This warranty shall not be applicable and shall be void if the defect 
has arisen through abuse, mistreatment or neglect. Any implied warranties applicable 
to this product are limited to the 90-day period described above. If failure of the 
software product, in the judgment of Origin, resulted from accident, abuse, mistreatment 
or neglect, or if the recording medium should fail after the original 90-day warranty 
period has expired, you may return the software program to Origin, at the address noted 
below with a check or money order for $5.00 (U.S. currency), which includes postage 
and handling, and Origin will mail a replacement to you. To receive a replacement, 
you should enclose the defective medium (including the original product label) in 
protective packaging accompanied by: (1) a $5.00 check (2) a brief statement 
describing the defect, and (3) your return address. 

EXCEPT AS SET FORTH ABOVE, THIS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER 
WARRANTIES, WHETHER ORAL OR WRITTEN, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING 
ANY WARRANT OF MERCHANTABILITY OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, 
AND NO OTHER REPRESENTATION OF CLAIMS OF ANY NATURE SHALL BE 
BINDING ON OR OBLIGATE ORIGIN. IN NO EVENT WILL ORIGIN BE LIABLE FOR 
SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGE RESULTING FROM 
POSSESSION, USE OR MALFUNCTION OF THIS PRODUCT, INCLUDING DAMAGE 
TO PROPERTY AND TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, DAMAGES FOR 
PERSONAL INJURY, EVEN IF ORIGIN HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY FOR 
SUCH DAMAGES. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG 
AN IMPLIED WARRANTY LASTS AND/OR THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF 
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION 
AND/OR EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. 
THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS. YOU MAY HAVE OTHER 
RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE. 



27 



Game Design 
Greg Malone 
Executive Producer 

Dallas Snell 
Associate Producer 
Jeff Hillhouse 
Programming 
Greg Malone 
Programming Assistance 
Dr. Cat 
Micromagic 
Alan Gardner 
John Miles 
Computer Graphics 
Greg Malone 

Jeff Dee 
Denis Loubet 
Glen Johnson 
Amanda Dee 
Keith Berdak 
Product Packaging 
Lori Ogwulu 
Cheryl Neeld 
Cat Pragoff 
Sabrena Allen 
Mike Harrison 
Documentation Writing 
Allen Varney 
Playbook Art 
Jennifer Ando 
Playtesting 
John Watson 
Joel Manners 
Paul Malone 
Steve Cantrell 
Jon Nials 
John Aslin 
Chris Whiteside 
Kirk Hutcheon 
Dan Coughlin 
Jonathan Lamy 
Photography 
Ray Studios 
Chinese Consultant 
Cheryl Chen 



Special thanks to... 

...the Quality Assur- 
ance playtest team who 
played WINDWALKER 
hundreds of times, pa- 
tiently, supportively and 
with great insight. Thanks 
for the hard effort and super 
suggestions. 

...Origin management, 
Dallas and Jeff, for both 
logistical and organiza- 
tional support, which was 
oft needed. I still can't 
believe you fell for it! 

...Rachel and Paul, my 
beautiful children, 17 and 
14, whose daily presence 
and understanding during 
the last several months of 
the project gave me that 
extra bit of incentive and 
drive that it required to 
get 'over the hump'. Love 
you both! 

...Human history, for 
being such a wonderful 
source of endless stories 
(and amusement)! 

ORIGIN 

(C) Copyright 1989 Greg Malone 

Origin Systems, Inc., 
P.O. Box 161750, Austin TX 78716 
Moebius and Windwalker are 
trademarks of Greg Malone. 
All rights reserved. 



28 



About the Author.. 




Windwalker is designed to 
encompass the oriental philosophy of "a 
simplistic approach to a complex world/' 
states author, Greg Malone. Such highly- 
acclaimed software games as Minit Man, 
published by Penguin Software and 
Moebius™, published by ORIGIN, il- 
lustrate Greg's desire to incorporate his 
personal philosophy and attention to 
detail into his work. Released in 1985, 
Moebius skyrocketed to the Top Ten of 
the Toys "R" Us sales charts, and has sold nearly 70,000 units to date. Computer 
Entertainer has hailed Moebius as "the Best Graphics Adventure Game for 1986." 
Encouraged by these facts and the positive feedback from his fans, Greg decided 
to produce a sequel. Windwalker, a richly illustrated and deeply researched 
story, features lightning-fast martial arts action blended with the delicate fabric 
of oriental mysticism and culture. 

Behind the intriguing design of Windwalker, one finds Greg's long-term 
fascination with the history and anthropology of other cultures, particularly the 
Orient. Greg muses, "Since many of Wind walker's graphics were taken from 
ancient Chinese scrolls, one can say that parts of Windwalker have been under 
development for over 3,000 years!" His attention to authenticity is also reflected 
in the detailed combat animations which Greg created using digitized images of 
live human models. In these ways, Greg has hoped to bring back to life a world 
and its people which have long passed into distant history. 

Greg resides in Austin, Texas with his daughter, Rachel and son, Paul. 
Rachel, age 17, is an aspiring artist, model and a certified aerobics instructor, 
while Paul, age 15, is following in "Dad's footsteps," being an accomplished 
"second generation" game designer. Diligent and hardworking, Greg is 
currently developing new product concepts, exploring diverse cultures and 
peoples. "The world provides us with a true treasure trove of ideas and stories 
to draw upon," Greg declares enthusiastically.